Covet

Mitra had been out hunting when they caught them. Of course they knew of the risks, every single one of them knew to stay out of the way of traders’ caravans when they came through the desert and yet… here they were, uncomfortably in a small cage, strapped to a camel’s side and bumping into the furry body with each swaying step it took. And of course they had to fall into the hands of traders who knew their business, knew enough to inject them with the antidote that’d make stinging anything virtually useless. Silently, Mitra fumed. What had the old ones told them over and over again, when they were still small and buried under the hot desert sand? If they catch you, you’re dead. They will bring you into the big city and have you fight against each other in a life-or-death struggle until you die. There were no stories of escapees in their lore. If they caught you, you were dead.

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Silmä and its continets

It goes like this – once upon a time, when the world was just a glint in the eye of the giant Melomenes, seven beings emerged from the dark. They were not fully formed yet; they were just there, like a particular unamusing thought which would not leave, no matter how hard the thinker tried. The giant tried to sweep his eye in a vain attempt to get rid of the thoughts but only succeeded in getting it loose, until it hung from his face only secured but the veins. In a fit of rage, the giant ripped it out fully and threw it away, where it floated in the vast darkness. Only then, the seven beings descended upon the floating eyeball and started to mold it in the image of the worlds they had seen flashing before the giant’s eyes.

Based on the creation legend, the world is named SILMÄ (‚eye‘ in Finnish) and is split into the following five continets:

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And it has to end somewhere else

Disclaimer: You are allowed criticise and you are more than allowed to point out grammatical errors or incorrect use of words due to English not being my native language. Also copyright by me but I always wanted to write that, so.

This part follows right after te other one publidhed and covers the first part of the story right up until the death of the original Pazuzu and Stephanus. Then shit hits the fan and I still have to write that out, shoot me.

Then the gods split up, Cruelty and Hate wandered over Silmä’s continents until they came to a marsh that was clad in fog so thick that even the fen fires had a hard time to be seen. They walked through the marsh, hand in hand, until it took a slope uphill into sparse trees that were crippled and mostly bald and until the sad shadow of a forest became stone. Until they stood on top of a cliff that fell down meters upon meters down to where the ocean broke itself in foamy waves on the bottom. “This is the land’s end”, Cruelty said: “Where we will lay the first stone to the place we will call home”. And she kissed Hate hard on the mouth, lips tight.

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It has to begin /somewhere/

Disclaimer: You are allowed criticise and you are more than allowed to point out grammatical errors or incorrec use of words due to English not being my native language. Also copyright by me but I always wanted to write that, so.

It goes like this – once upon a time, when the world was just a glint in the eye of the giant Melomenes, seven beings emerged from the dark. They were not fully formed yet; they were just there, like a particular unamusing thought which would not leave, no matter how hard the thinker tried. The giant tried to sweep his eye in a vain attempt to get rid of the thoughts but only succeeded in getting it loose, until it hung from his face only secured but the veins. In a fit of rage, the giant ripped it out fully and threw it away, where it floated in the vast darkness. Only then, the seven beings descended upon the floating eyeball and started to mold it in the image of the worlds they had seen flashing before the giant’s eyes.

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Theodore

Angrboda is a practical woman. When it becomes clear that she is with child she marches up to her father and announces her intent to carry it to term, to give him the grandchild he’d been nagging her for ages. She also makes it clear that she has no intention of caring for it till it becomes an adult. They strike a bargain – she raises the child until it’s three, for those precarious years where ideas can be easily implanted in a mind that’s not fully formed yet and then she is free to do as she wishes.

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